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Archive for the month “Aprilie, 2016”

Giro d’Italia Roadbook

Giro roadbook

Liège–Bastogne–Liège Stats

Historical stats

– The first edition took place in 1892 and was won by Leon Houa

– Eddy Merckx holds the record for the most victories: 5, between 1969 and 1975

– The same Merckx has the most podiums: 7

– Belgium leads the nations standings, with 59 wins, followed by Italy (12) and Switzerland (10)

– Seven riders have won both Flèche Wallonne and Liège–Bastogne–Liège in the same season: Moreno Argentin, Philippe Gilbert Ferdi Kubler, Eddy Merckx, Stan Ockers, Davide Rebellin and Alejandro Valverde

– No U23 winner went on to take the victory as a pro

– Four cyclists from outside of Europe nabbed the win: Simon Gerrans (Australia), Tyler Hamilton (U.S.A.), Maxim Iglinskiy (Kazahstan) and Alexandre Vinokourov (Kazahstan)

– Since Bernard Hinault (1980), no other reigning Tour de France champion has won the Belgian Monument

– Moreno Argentin, in 1987, was the last rainbow jersey wearer to finish first

– Biggest winning margin was recorded in 1893, when Leon Houa came home half an hour ahead of his fellow countryman, Michel Borisowski

– The inaugural edition had 33 riders at the start, with only 17 of them getting to the finish

– Besides Belgium, only Italy got to place three cyclists on the podium, at the 2005 edition of Liège–Bastogne–Liège

– The race has been affected by snow in 1919, 1957 and 1980

– Until 1973, ten editions have finished on the Stade Vélodrome de Rocourt, a 40 000-seat arena

– Since 1992, the race ends in Ans, a suburb of Liège

– Longest dry spell without a Belgian victory was between 2000 and 2011

– In 1957, the win was awarded to two riders: Germain Derycke and Frans Schoubben

– Youngest ever winner is Victor Fastre (18 years and 362 days); oldest one is Alexandr Vinokourov (36 years and 221 days)

– Davide Rebellin is the rider with the most editions completed, 14

2016 stats

– 25 teams (18 World Tour and 7 Pro Continental) will line-up for the 102nd edition

– Only one of these teams hasn’t scored a victory this season: Giant-Alpecin

– The course is 253-km long and includes ten categorized climbs

– Three former winners are at the start of the race: Simon Gerrans, Daniel Martin and Alejandro Valverde

– The cyclists who will ride the 2016 edition have won a combined total of 11 Monuments, 2 world titles, 6 Grand Tours and more than 90 Grand Tour stages

– Of the riders who are at the start, Joaquim Rodriguez has the most participations: 13

– France is the country with the most riders in the race – 38 – followed by Belgium (26) and the Netherlands (18)

– Alejandro Valverde can become the first rider in 18 years to claim back-to-back victories

– Laurens De Plus (20 years) is the youngest rider who will line-up in Liège, while Haimar Zubeldia is the oldest one (39 years)

– Liège–Bastogne–Liège marks 1827 days since the last win of the hosts in this event

– Five winners of the U23 race will ride the 102nd edition: Jan Bakelants, Guillaume Martin, Anthony Turgis, Michael Valgren and Tosh Van der Sande

– 11 neo-pros will make their debut in a Monument at “La Doyenne”: Koen Bouwman, Lilian Calmejane, Jeremy Cornu, Laurens De Plus, Odd Christian Eiking, Sindre Lunke, Guillaume Martin, Sam Oomen, Antwan Tolhoek, Alexey Vermeulen and Loic Vliegen

Paris-Roubaix Stats

Historical stats

– The first edition took place in 1896 and was won by Germany’s Josef Fischer

– Paris-Roubaix was the first Classic to be shown live on TV, in 1960

– Two Belgians – Tom Boonen and Roger De Vlaeminck – share the record for the most wins, 4

– Roger De Vlaeminck is also the rider with the most podium finishes, 9

– Belgium leads the nation standings, with 55 triumphs in 112 editions

– Frédéric Guesdon holds the record for the most starts, 17

– Raymond Impanis and Servais Knaven have the most races completed, 16 each

– Ten riders have won the Tour of Flanders and Paris-Roubaix in the same year: Tom Boonen, Fabian Cancellara, Fred De Bruyne, Roger De Vlaeminck, Romain Gijssels, Raymond Impanis, Gaston Rebry, Heiri Suter, Rik Van Looy and Peter Van Petegem

– The longest edition never exceeded 280 kilometers, while the shortest one had 244 kilometers

– Marc Madiot is the only cyclist who has won Paris-Roubaix in the U23 ranks and subsequently as a pro

– In 1949, the victory was awarded to two riders: Serse Coppi and André Mahé

– Australia’s Stuart O’Grady is the only cyclist from outside of Europe who nabbed the win in Paris-Roubaix (2007)

– The longest successful breakaway was recorded in 1988, when Dirk Demol won after being for 222 kilometers at the front

– Last rainbow jersey wearer to emerge victorious is Bernard Hinault (1981)

– Five riders have won Paris-Roubaix after taking the victory in the Tour de France: Louison Bobet, Fausto Coppi, Felice Gimondi, Bernard Hinault and Eddy Merckx

– In 1936 – when Georges Speicher was victorious – the race ended on a hippodrome

– Between 1986 and 1988, Paris-Roubaix finished in the town, because the velodrome was undergoing some repairs

– First year in which riders were allowed to get a spare wheel from their teammates was 1965

– Youngest ever winner is Albert Champion (20 years and 362 days in 1899); oldest one is Gilbert Duclos-Lasalle (38 years and 229 days in 1993)

– Last French success was brought by Frédéric Guesdon, in 1997

– In 1990, Eddy Planckaert and Steve Bauer sprinted for the victory and the Belgian won for just 1 cm

– Biggest winning margin dates from 1898, when Maurice Garin finished 28 minutes ahead of Auguste Stephan

– 1968 was the first year in which the start was given from Compiègne

– First time when the champion received a cobblestone trophy was in 1977

– Highest average speed – 45,130 km/h – was recorded in 1964, while the lowest one was in 1922 – 22,857 km/h

2016 stats

– 25 teams (18 World Tour and 7 Pro Continental) will line-up in Compiègne for the 114th edition

– Three of these teams are winless this season: Delko Marseille, Giant-Alpecin, Wanty-Groupe Gobert

– The course is 257.5-km long and features 52.8 kilometers of cobblestones across 27 cobbled sectors

– 33 countries will be represented in the peloton, with Belgium topping the list (36 riders)

– Three former champions are at the start of this year’s race: Tom Boonen, Fabian Cancellara and Niki Terpstra

– Four U23 winners (Koen De Kort, Damien Gaudin, Taylor Phinney, Ramon Sinkeldam) and four Junior winners (Andrew Fenn, Florian Senechal, Jasper Stuyven, Guillaume Van Keirsbulck) will be in the race

– Franck Bonnamour (20 years) is the youngest rider at the start line, while Svein Tuft (38 years) is the oldest one

– Mathew Hayman has the most participation of the riders in the race: 14

– Paris-Roubaix 2016 marks 6937 days since the last home win in the race

– 10 neo-pros will make their debut in a Monument at Paris-Roubaix: Mikel Aristi, Franck Bonnamour, Romain Combaud, Frederik Frison, Fredrik Strand Galta, Fabien Grellier, Hugo Hofstetter, Martin Laas, Ryan Mullen and Robin Stenuit

– The Paris-Roubaix peloton has won a combined total of 21 Monuments, 10 world titles (road race+time trial) and more than 120 Grand Tour stages

2016 Paris-Roubaix cobbled sectors rating

Number Name Kilometer Length Rating
27 Troisvilles 98.5 2200 m ***
26 Viesly 105 1800 m ***
25 Quiévy 107.5 3700 m ****
24 Saint-Python 112.5 1500 m **
23 Vertain 120.5 2300 m ***
22 Capelle-Ruesnes 127 1700 m ***
21 Quérénaing – Maing 137.5 2500 m ***
20 Monchaux-sur-Ecaillon 141 1600 m ***
19 Haveluy 154 2500 m ****
18 Trouée d’Arenberg 162 2400 m *****
17 Wallers – Hélesmes 168 1600 m ****
16 Hornaing 175 3700 m ****
15 Warlaing – Brillon 182.5 2400 m ***
14 Tilloy – Sars-et-Rosières 186 2400 m ****
13 Beuvry-la-Forêt – Orchies 192.5 1400 m ***
12 Orchies 197.5 1700 m ***
11 Auchy-lez-Orchies – Bersée 203.5 2700 m ****
10 Mons-en-Pévèle 209 3000 m *****
9 Mérignies – Avelin 215 700 m **
8 Pont-Thibaut 218 1400 m ***
7 Templeuve – Moulin de Vertain 224.5 500 m **
6 Cysoing – Bourghelles 231 1300 m ***
  Bourghelles – Wannehain 233.5 1100 m ***
5 Camphin-en-Pévèle 238 1800 m ****
4 Le Carrefour de l’Arbre 240.5 2100 m *****
3 Gruson 243 1100 m **
2 Hem 249.5 1400 m **
1 Roubaix 256.5 300 m *

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